Sunday, December 06, 2009

2nd Gay Bishop Elected for Episcopal Church

This development (the new bishop is to the right in the photo) will no doubt cause the knuckle draggers and Neanderthals within the Anglican Communion to go into convulsions and wet themselves. In contrast, I applaud the move of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angles. History is on the side of the progressive denominations who have moved to be LGBT inclusive while the homophobic "conservatives" I suspect will be view much like George Wallace when he stood in the school house door to block black children from entering an all white school. The younger generation is much more gay accepting and a majority support same sex marriage. That tide of history will not be reversed and anti-gay denominations may well be setting the stage for their own long term demise if their bigotry and hypocrisy of selective Bible parsing continues - something that would truly be a case of Divine justice. Here are some highlights from the Los Angeles Times:
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The Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles today elected the first openly gay bishop since the national church lifted a ban that sought to bar gays and lesbians from the church's highest ordained ministry. Clergy and lay leaders, meeting in Riverside for their annual convention, elected the Rev. Canon Mary D. Glasspool, 55, who has been in a committed relationship with another woman since 1988.
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Glasspool’s election to fill one of two openings for bishops of the diocese followed the selection Friday of the Rev. Canon Diane Jardine Bruce, 53, the rector of a San Clemente church. The two became the first women elected as bishops of the diocese in its 114-year history.
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But it was the endorsement of Glasspool that riveted much of the convention as well as the worldwide Anglican Communion, of which the Episcopal Church is the U.S. branch. Glasspool is the first openly gay priest to be elected bishop since the ordination of the Rt. Rev. V. Gene Robinson of New Hampshire in 2003.
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Convention delegates said that Glasspool's sexual orientation was only one factor in their decision, which came on the seventh ballot for the position. They called her a gifted priest with extensive diocesan experience in her current role as canon -- or executive assistant -- to the bishops of the Diocese of Maryland. "I don't think it's a referendum on electing a woman or a gay person," said the Very Rev. Mark Kowalewski, dean of St. John's Cathedral in downtown Los Angeles. "Those are secondary characteristics."